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Mood-Stabilizing Medications for Cats

Mood-Stabilizing Medications for Cats

A properly-prescribed and administered anti-anxiety drug can greatly help to improve an unhappy cat's quality of life. Here's how they work.

September 2017 - When it comes to feline behavior, we have some good news: It’s often quite easy to tell whether a cat is fundamentally happy or profoundly disturbed, according to Stephanie Borns-Weil, DVM, who is head of the Tufts Animal Behavior Clinic. “Although there is likely to be a good bit of variation from animal to animal, a happy and contented cat will tend to be very sociable. She’ll engage with people, she’ll be interested in her…

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feline inhaled medications

Inhaled Medications for Cats

Asthma is the most common reason for prescribing inhaled medications, but they offer options for other cats, too. Here's how they are utilized.

As you probably have already experienced first hand, cats can be tricky to medicate. Veterinarians know that it is difficult for many owners to medicate a cat consistently with a medication that is required twice daily, and almost impossible to administer a medication reliably and unfailingly three times daily.

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Chronic Gingivostomatitis  in Cats

Diagnosis: Chronic Gingivostomatitis

It's a painful inflammatory condition that causes significant discomfort to many cats. Often, a full-mouth tooth extraction is the most successful treatment choice.

A common reason clients bring their cat in to my cats-only veterinary hospital is halitosis (this is the medical term for bad breath). Cats are carnivores, and given their meat- and fish-based diets, nobody expects a cat’s mouth to be minty fresh. But some cats’ mouths have a smell that goes beyond simple fish-breath.

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Getting Involved in Feline Agility

Getting Involved in Feline Agility

It's an accessible hobby that can help strengthen the bond with your cat, provide exercise and just bring some fun into both of your lives!

The truth is, you can herd cats. You can even get them to jump through hoops, weave around poles, climb ladders and scoot through tunnels. It’s called feline agility. “It’s the most fun I’ve had in ages,” says Jill Archibald, a retired physical education teacher who is now the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) Feline Agility Coordinator. “When you learn feline agility, it really helps you to develop a good relationship with your cat.”

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