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Is Your Veterinarian Practicing Narrative Medicine?

Is Your Veterinarian Practicing Narrative Medicine?

A way to establish rapport, empathy, and better diagnosis and treatment.

September 2019 - If you bring your cat to the veterinarian’s office because he’s vomiting, does the doctor simply perform a clinical exam followed by x-rays and blood work, or does she add in some questions that help her learn the story of the cat’s life? For instance, a vet might ask, “Has anything changed lately? Have you moved, or has someone moved into or out of your household? Has there been a divorce or some other difficult event?” That way, the doctor may find out that the cat is stressed, perhaps because he is sensing your own stress, and that is what is making him throw up.

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Litter Boxes to Suit Every Cat’s Preferences

Litter Boxes to Suit Every Cat’s Preferences

Features that suit your pet's wishes will make your life easier, too.

Kicked litter, spraying, onerous clean-up of not only the box but also the surrounding area…no wonder litter boxes are often a source of vexation for cat owners. But what if you could find a model that best suits your cat’s proclivities, making her elimination time easier and more pleasant — which in turn could make your life more pleasant as well?

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Options for Getting a Cat with Diabetes Off Insulin

Options for Getting a Cat with Diabetes Off Insulin

There's potential in the meal plan.

“It is always something of a financial challenge having a diabetic pet,” says Orla Mahony, DVM, a veterinarian at Tufts’s Foster Hospital for Small Animals. Frequent monitoring of the cat’s blood sugar at the veterinarian’s office to be certain it remains in the correct range is in itself a significant but important expense for avoiding organ damage and other complications of diabetes.

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Belly Rubs Gone Wrong

Belly Rubs Gone Wrong

Why do they roll on their backs right in front of you if they don't want their bellies stroked?

Your cat rolls over on her back and presents her belly to you, so you return the apparent gesture of affection by stroking it, as you would for a dog. But instead of relaxing and enjoying the moment, she turns into the feline version of Cujo, scratching and biting you to make you stop. Why did she show you her belly if she didn’t want you anywhere near it?

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