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When You’re Advised to Deliver Fluids Subcutaneously

When You’re Advised to Deliver Fluids Subcutaneously

Hydrating your cat with a needle and a drip sounds scary, but you can do it.

June 2019 - The day may very well come when your cat cannot take in enough water by mouth or urinates excessively, and your veterinarian tells you to combat the threat of dehydration through your pet’s skin. After all, a number of diseases that befall cats can rob their bodies of fluid. These include diabetes, liver disease, pancreatitis, and chronic kidney failure. Chronic kidney disease alone affects half of all cats between the ages of 10 and 15 and almost 70 percent of cats over age 15, according to research conducted at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

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About Those Sandpapery Tongues

About Those Sandpapery Tongues

You know those spikes in the ground as you leave the airport car rental parking lot with the signs telling you not to back up? That’s an approximation of the hundreds of hooked spikes on a cat’s tongue that face backwards, toward the throat, giving it its rough feel. And now scientists are getting a better understanding of why these tiny claw-like tongue spikes are there.

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Making Vet Visits Less Stressful

Making Vet Visits Less Stressful

Tips for getting your cat and you to stay calm at the doctor's office.

It’s a perfect storm. Cats hide their illnesses very well; it’s often not clear that they’re sick until they’re at death’s door, which is why annual wellness exams are so critical. Through blood tests and other diagnostic workups, a veterinarian can detect problems even a very tuned-in owner might miss.

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oveweight cat

Fat Cats

The risks of excess weight, and solutions to the problem.

Many more cats are overweight than in the past. The most recent numbers indicate that up to 66 percent of our cats carry around excess pounds — two out of three felines. The chances for adverse health effects are significant.

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