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Examining Your Cat’s Sleep Needs

Examining Your Cat’s Sleep Needs

What is a normal amount of sleep? What diseases might sleeplessness signify?

April 2019 - If you think your cat sleeps an awful lot, you’re right — and there’s nothing wrong with that. Cats naturally sleep about 17 hours per day — fully two-thirds of their lives. But much of that slumber is not what we think of when we think of sleep. It’s more akin to what your car does when it idles, ready to move at a moment’s notice. The trigger that might rouse your pet into becoming fully awake from her dozing might be prey, the smell of food, or someone entering the room. Your cat will be ready to respond as though she had not been asleep at all.

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How Long Can You Leave Your Cat Alone?

How Long Can You Leave Your Cat Alone?

A healthy cat will be perfectly fine for a weekend. Longer periods raise concerns.

One of the perks of being a cat lover is that you don’t have to make sure you’re home several times a day to walk your pet. Indeed, a feline can spend more than a day by herself and be none the worse for the solitude. Even cats who crave company would rather be left in a familiar environment than boarded at a facility. They’ll take the temporary loneliness over the stress of being put in a crate, brought out to the car, driven to the boarder’s, and having to contend with the sights, odors, and sounds of cats they don’t know.

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Overcoming Litter Box Aversion

Overcoming Litter Box Aversion

Sometimes the solution to a cat's always "going" outside the box is as simple as fixing something about the box itself.

When a cat will not relieve herself in her litter box, it’s either for a medical or a behavioral reason.

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Tail Injuries

Tail Injuries

Some are self-healing; others require tending.

Rocking chairs, a foot landing in the wrong place, a door closing at the wrong time — all of these can cause tail injuries. Still, “we don’t see that many cat tail injuries,” says Armelle de Laforcade, DVM, an emergency and critical care veterinarian at Tufts’ Foster Hospital for Small Animals. “In the grand scheme of emergencies that come in, it isn’t all that common.”

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