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A Visit to Tufts' Foster Hospital

A Visit to Tufts' Foster Hospital

Even though you may assume that a teaching hospital is a very hectic place, a lot of effort is devoted to providing a stress-free environment for cats. Here's how.

February 2017 - Even though you may assume that a teaching hospital is a very hectic place, a lot of effort is devoted to providing a stress-free environment for cats. Here's how.

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Cat Neutering 101

Early Spay/Neutering 101

Habits change slowly. Therefore, many pet owners — and even many veterinarians — still wait longer than they should to get their cats spayed/neutered. A website that Dr. McCobb recommends is www.whentospay.org, run by the non-profit Humane Alliance. Some myth-dispelling facts include: At least 50 percent of litters are unplanned. Spaying/neutering helps eliminate annoying behaviors such as spraying, roaming, yowling and fighting, as well as heat cycles. (Female cats can go into heat up to 10 times a year.)

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Feeding the Cat With FLUTD

Feeding the Cat With FLUTD

It can be a complex diagnosis, and it requires a specific feeding program. That's why it's so important to rely on a veterinary diagnosis and advice for its treatment.

Feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) is commonly seen in cats, and it has many different causes. FLUTD isn’t a specific disease itself, but actually a broad term that describes any physical illness or condition that affects the lower urinary tract — the urinary bladder and urethra (the tube that’s connected to the bladder which carries urine to the outside of the body).

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Cat's claws

Alternatives to Declawing

Because it's impossible to eliminate this natural feline behavior, we share ways to gently redirect your cat's scratching without resorting to surgical intervention.

As you probably already know, the topic of declawing in cats is quite controversial, and some veterinary hospitals, including Tufts University’s School of Veterinary Medicine, do not perform it. For those who are unclear, here is what is involved in the procedure: Under anesthesia, each of the cat’s claws and the third bone of every toe are removed with a laser, blade or nail trimmers.

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