Sign Up for Cat Talk
Get the latest health and behavior news and
advice from the veterinarians at Tufts University.
Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

There are different causes for halitosis in cats some far more serious than others. Your best strategy is to schedule an appointment with your vet.

May 2016 - Cats are well known for being exceptionally clean animals. They take pride in their appearance — grooming constantly to remove any offensive odors that might make them detectable to both predators and prey. Occasionally, however, cats sometimes do emit a foul odor. Although there are several possible reasons for a cat to be malodorous, halitosis (bad breath) is the most common cause of fetid felines.

Continue Reading

A Weighty Dilemma for Cats: Overweight vs. Obese

A Weighty Dilemma for Cats: Overweight vs. Obese

Experts want to find a way to standardize the term overweight, which remains poorly defined by vets.

According to an annual survey from the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), about 58 percent of cats and 54 percent of dogs in the United States are overweight. The most recent survey involved 1224 cats and dogs from 136 participating veterinary clinics, with these clinics assessing the body condition score (BCS) of all feline and canine patients that came in for a regular wellness examination on the same day last October. (A BCS was based…

Continue Reading

Understanding Skin Lumps in Cats

Understanding Skin Lumps in Cats

Most are harmless and readily treatable, while others can be life-threatening. Learn how to spot the difference, and what you should do.

Just as cats come in a broad range of shapes, sizes and colors, so do the various lumps and bumps that may appear on their skin. While such palpable swellings can be alarming to see or feel, they’re usually harmless, according to Michael Stone, DVM, clinical assistant professor at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. “Skin lumps are a frequent cause for concern for cat owners,” he says.

Continue Reading

How to Feed Your Diabetic Cat

How to Feed Your Diabetic Cat

With the help of your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist it may even be possible to modify your cats diet so that she goes into remission.

When your cat is diagnosed with diabetes, it’s certainly going to require a lifestyle change for your pet, explains Deborah Linder, DVM, Head of Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “Your cat can do very well, and have an excellent quality of life for many years,” she says. “But it does require intensive management by the owner.”

Continue Reading

Ask Tufts Experts