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What Appetite Changes Can Mean on Cats

What Appetite Changes Can Mean on Cats

A shift in eating habits can be harder to spot in a multicat household, but eating too much or too little are red flags that require your attention

August 2016 - You’d think it would be relatively easy to spot when a cat’s appetite is flagging — or revving up. “If you have one cat, it’s fairly obvious when your cat is not eating the same amount of food,” explains Linda A. Ross, DVM, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “But the majority of cat owners have more than one cat. When you live with two…

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Are Cats Actually Finicky?

Are Cats Actually Finicky?

As it turns out, they may possess some intangible ability to identify diets that best meet their nutritional needs.

Many cat owners consider their cats to be finicky when it comes to the foods carefully chosen for them. In search of various flavors, textures, consistencies and list of ingredients, we sometimes can’t make heads or tails of the foods our cats prefer, and why. A new study may shed light on this mystery, however. …

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Intestinal Intussusception in Cats

Intestinal Intussusception in Cats

This is a condition that describes an intestinal problem that if not recognized and treated promptly could have dire consequences for your cat.

A few months ago, a client brought her four-month-old female kitten, Squeegee, to my feline-only veterinary hospital for an exam. The kitten had been doing great, eating well, growing nicely and playing like a maniac — until two days before when she began to vomit. She became lethargic, the vomiting progressed and her appetite abruptly disappeared. …

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Fending Off the Feline Feud

Fending Off the Feline Feud

Nicholas Dodman, BVMS, delivers a step-by-step plan to stop redirected aggression between two cats in the same home. Here's how it works.

When two cats who were formerly tolerant of each other or even mutually bonded suddenly start fighting with each other, the diagnosis is almost certainly “redirected aggression.” A typical scenario, sometimes witnessed by the owner, is that two friendly cats are sitting next to each other on a windowsill, looking at the wide world outside, when all of a sudden something scary — perhaps another cat or a dog — comes into their view.

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