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The ‘Guaranteed Analysis’ Puzzle

The ‘Guaranteed Analysis’ Puzzle

Decoding one of the biggest sources of confusion regarding cat food labels: Lots of numbers that are hard for pet owners to put into practical use.

March 2018 - When you look at the label on any package of cat food, the most dizzying part will no doubt be the Guaranteed Analysis, a bunch of numbers given either as percentages or “milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg)” with no accompanying key to explain their meaning in a cat’s diet. To make matters even more complicated, each number is listed as a “minimum” or “maximum,” so you don’t know whether you’re getting the least or, conversely, the most allowed.

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dog and cat

Are Dogs Smarter Than Cats?

Based on new research, experts are suggesting that the answer points to ... "yes."

According to a study published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, dogs possess more brain power than cats. This was determined by researchers, who counted the number of neurons in the cerebral cortexes of the brains of a number of animals, including cats and dogs.

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Adding to Your Family

Adding to Your Family

Do we always have a choice when we're bringing a new pet into our home?

When you adopted your cat (or cats), did you have the opportunity to select her based on her age, personality or temperament? Over the years, I did choose a few adult cats from a shelter environment — and had the opportunity to make a choice of, say, a cuddly, interactive cat over a more fearful one.

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older cat

Extra Care for the Senior Cat

Age-related changes can be hard on a pet and also her owner. Here are some tips to make sure your cat's golden years are as happy and healthy as possible.

Believe it or not, there was a time when cats were considered “seniors” when they reached the age of seven or eight years old. As a result of the major breakthroughs in veterinary care — along with the many advances in feline nutrition — cats are now considered “elderly” at twelve, “seniors” at age fourteen and “geriatric” at the age of fifteen.

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