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Cancer Treatments for Cats

Cancer Treatments for Cats

As with people, cats commonly get cancer, especially as they get older. The most common types affect the white blood cells, skin and mammary glands.

November 2018 - Cancer. The word alone evokes high emotions, whether it’s impacting a family member, friend or beloved pet. Our thoughts tend to run from astonishment to guilt and fear as we grapple to come to terms with the new reality and what to do next. Like humans, our pets are also living longer these days — and that fact alone contributes to the likelihood of our cats one day developing cancer.

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cat vaccination

Free Vaccinations for Life!

Yes, you read that right. Increasingly more veterinary practices are offering a program with clients that aims to help the overall health of their pets.

Google “free vaccines for life” and you will see page after page of veterinary practices that engage in this very type of program — free vaccines annually for cats who are patients at these clinics. They all operate a bit differently, but here’s the gist. If you take your cat to the clinic once a year for her wellness visit, vaccines deemed necessary at that time will be given at no cost.

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Why You Should Adopt an Older Cat

Why You Should Adopt an Older Cat

The calm and quiet demeanor of an adult cat might be just the perfect fit for your home the next time you're looking to adopt a pet.

It’s always fun to see playful kittens when you are at an adoption shelter (or anywhere, for that matter!). They are fluffy, adorable and hard to resist — but we also know that they require a lot of energy to raise properly. Sometimes, it’s the older cat sitting quietly in her cage who is the best choice for your particular household.

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cat inside carrier

Advantages of Cats-Only Clinics

Your pet will receive care in a less stressful setting, and will benefit from staff and veterinarians who are extra knowledgable about cat behavior and health conditions.

All companion animals require regular veterinary attention. Cats aren’t “little dogs” — they have their own unique and specific medical requirements. Additionally, many cats are extremely anxious when being cared for at a veterinary hospital that cares for both dogs and cats. To provide cats with the most appropriate care — and the least stressful experience possible — there are many advantages in using the services of a feline-only veterinary practice.

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