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March 2019

Full Issue (PDF)

March 2019 - Full Issue PDFSubscribers Only

 

Feature

The Right Way to Pet a Cat

What cats need often doesn’t jibe with the way we live our lives. We’re gone all day, leaving them with no interaction, then come home and want to spend the evening petting and handling them.   More...

Purring Has More Than One Meaning

Many cat lovers assume felines purr only when they’re content. And while it’s certainly true that a cat basking in the sun, half on her back, might purr as an expression of contentment, she might also purr when she’s afraid or in pain, say, during labor or when she has experienced physical trauma. The low frequency of the vibrations inside her body can ease breathing and is even thought by some to help to heal injuries.   More...

How to Rescue a Cat From a Tree (Hint: Quietly)

On television shows, rescuing a cat from a tree becomes a noisy neighborhood affair. Onlookers are shouting to each other and the fire fighter climbing through the upper limbs is calling down with progress reports. All that noise is the last thing a scared cat needs and won’t help coaxing it into the arms of rescuers.   More...

Make an Appointment? Or Get Him to the Vet Immediately?Subscribers Only

Your cat is having a bout of vomiting. Do you rush him to the doctor? What if he hasn’t urinated all day, or goes through the day with zero interest in food or water? Here is a look at six common signs of illness in cats, and whether they can wait or signal emergencies that need immediate medical attention.   More...

The Hardest Decision of All: When to Say Good-ByeSubscribers Only

If your cat all of a sudden seems gravely ill, don’t automatically assume it’s the end. “Sometimes something that seems quite dire may not be,” says Catnip editor-in-chief John Berg, DVM. “Even if a disease is not curable, it may be very treatable, and the cat can live a good quality of life for quite a while. We’ve delivered that news to a great number of relieved owners.”   More...

When the cat gets into the dog foodSubscribers Only

If your cat gets into your dog’s food here and there, it’s not something to be alarmed about. But dog food is most certainly not appropriate as the mainstay of a cat’s diet and should never be fed instead of cat food. In fact, a dog could much more easily get by on cat food than a cat on dog food (although both cats and dogs should be fed diets prepared with their own species in mind). Here are some of cats’ unique dietary needs that make dog food the wrong — and unsafe — choice as a cat’s “meat and potatoes,” so to speak.   More...

Bad Breath May Signal IllnessSubscribers Only

Bad breath, medically termed halitosis, is a “common problem in cats,” says Tufts veterinary internist Michael Stone, DVM, and can be severe enough to “create problems in the animal-owner relationship.” For sure, it’s hard to get up close and personal with a cat whose breath smells worse than fishy.   More...

What Kind of Adult Cat Will Your Kitten Grow Into?Subscribers Only

How a kitten is — or isn’t — nurtured tells a lot about the kind of adult cat she will grow into. For instance, a very young kitten who is picked up often and held for 15 to 45 minutes a day will probably end up a lot less fearful and skittish around people. And the more people who cuddle her, the more comfortable around human beings she will be.   More...

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