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January 2018

Full Issue (PDF)

January 2018 - Full Issue PDFSubscribers Only

 

Editor's Note

The Primordial Pouch

This month’s ‘Short Takes’ makes me particularly happy, and I really hope it sparks a trend in the animal welfare community. Researchers at the University of Georgia are matching senior citizens who live alone with shelter cats — to see if the relationship is helpful at making the person feel less lonely and with more purpose.   More...

Feature

Understanding the Vet Tech’s Role

Officially, there’s no such thing as a veterinary nurse. The people who act in that capacity are termed veterinary technicians. But it’s confusing. Why aren’t veterinary technicians just called veterinary nurses in the first place?   More...

How to Choose the Best Cat LitterSubscribers Only

When we invite cats to live with us in our homes, it’s our responsibility to align their basic needs as closely as possible to Mother Nature’s provisions. The natural substrate that cats use outdoors for elimination is dirt or sand.   More...

What Constitutes An Emergency?Subscribers Only

Cats are masters at hiding pain and illness, which can make it difficult for their owners to recognize that something is amiss. However, owners should become concerned when they observe persistent subtle changes in their cat’s behavior such as eating less, sleeping or hiding more than usual or reduced interest in playing or socializing.   More...

What is Cryptococcosis?

Earlier in the year, I received a phone call from a cat owner seeking a second opinion. Their four-year-old male orange tabby, Teddy, has always been a bit of a troublemaker, knocking things off counters, chasing imaginary mice and leaving no houseplant un-nibbled. Over the last few weeks, however, Teddy had been battling a stubborn upper respiratory infection (URI), and it was only getting worse, despite treatment.   More...

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Compared with its human counterpart, the feline heart is quite tiny — only two inches or so in diameter, about the size of a golf ball. This hollow, muscular organ, however, is structured almost exactly like the human heart and plays the same powerful life-sustaining role.   More...

An Antidote for Loneliness?

Researchers are going to start examining the benefits of pet ownership on mental and emotional health in older adults living alone by matching research participants with homeless foster cats.   More...

Ask the Doctor

Dear Doctor: Are Vegetables Beneficial?

My wife likes to purée vegetables — like peas, carrots and sweet potato — and mix it into our cat’s canned food. Is this okay to do? Are there any vegetables that should never be added to the cat food? We also add some cranberry powder (made for cats), along with some hairball powder. We trying to be to health-minded, but can we be causing potential problems?   More...

Dear Doctor: Blood Work: How Often?

I have an eight-year-old cat who I rescued from a shelter as a kitten. I take Daisy to our local veterinarian once a year for a health examination. During our last visit, the veterinarian recommended that we run blood work every year. Is this really necessary for my cat, who is overall healthy? If so, can you explain the advantages of looking at blood work every year?   More...