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May 2017

Full Issue (PDF)

May 2017 - Full Issue PDFSubscribers Only

 

Editor's Note

The Plight of the Feral Cat

When you think of Hawaii, you probably picture cerulean blue oceans, wafting palm trees, towering volcanoes and picturesque beaches (and maybe even Elvis!). What you may not imagine are feral cats — and lots of them! With a temperate climate, no natural predators and, until recently, not enough affordable spay/neuter options, free-roaming cats have taken root in the Hawaiian Islands in a significant way.   More...

Feature

Can Probiotics Help Your Cat?

Over the last two decades, probiotics have become a hot topic in both human and veterinary medicine. An enormous body of research has clearly indicated that probiotics can cause a positive change in the intestinal bacterial population when pathogenic bacteria overtake the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics have also been shown to have a beneficial effect on the immune system.   More...

The Deadly Threat of ParvovirusSubscribers Only

Vomiting, severe diarrhea, diminished appetite, fever, listlessness, progressive weight loss and general weakness are among the signs of a deadly feline illness called parvovirus. This potentially fatal disorder — also known as panleukopenia or distemper — is an illness for which there is no specific treatment. Fortunately, a highly effective vaccine is available to provide cats with long-lasting immunity against the feline parvovirus (FPV) — the organism that is responsible for spreading the disease.   More...

Home Renovation and Your PetsSubscribers Only

Before Andrew Davidson embarked on a major home renovation project two years ago, the Long Island resident sat down and planned every step of the process — including a discussion on how to make life as stress-free as possible for his two cats, Blaze and Sadie.   More...

How To Get Involved in TNRSubscribers Only

Trap Neuter Return (TNR) is a non-lethal method of controlling community cat populations that has been practiced in the United States since the early 1990s. Using this technique, all the feral (wild) cats in a colony (group) are humanely trapped, spayed or neutered, vaccinated for rabies, treated for any injuries, ear tipped for identification and then returned to their home territory where they are fed, sheltered and monitored by a caregiver. Whenever possible, kittens and friendly adults are removed from the colony and offered for adoption.   More...

The Modern Threat of Rabies

Among all threats to feline health, none is more fatal than rabies. The threat also applies to cat owners who are bitten or scratched by an infected animal. Rabies is caused by a bullet-shaped virus called a lyssavirus, and this microorganism affects many warm-blooded animals, most commonly in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes, bobcats and bats. However, notes Dr. Orla Wages, a specialist in internal medicine in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Tufts, the virus can affect all warm-blooded animals, including domestic dogs and cats that have not been vaccinated.   More...

The Allure of Catnip

As we all know, many cats just can’t enough of catnip — nepeta cataria, a fragrantly intoxicating plant native to Asia — although why it has such an effect on cats has remained a mystery. However, recent research may shed new light on the riddle — as well as identify a few other substances that may delight your cat even more.   More...

Ask the Doctor

Dear Doctor: Adopting an FIV-positive Cat

I have been sponsoring a cat at a purebred rescue facility who is FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) positive. I have two cats who are elderly (12 and 14 years old), but healthy. I’ve been told that if I adopt my sponsored cat, my own cats won’t be affected by this disease — unless they receive a deep bite wound. Is this true?   More...

Dear Doctor: Meaning of ‘board-certified’ Veterinarian

I am a long-time subscriber who enjoys the publication very much. I feel that the information has helped me to take better care of the cats who live with us (at present time, we have four cats). My question is this: What exactly does “board-certified” mean, and how does a veterinarian achieve that qualification?   More...