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Editor's Note October 2016 Issue

Wellness Exam for your Pets

Have you scheduled a wellness exam for your pets this year? If not, what are you waiting for?

Dreamstime.com

Even though similar statistics have been available before, it has become even more evident this year that cat owners don’t take seriously the idea of regular veterinary visits.

Thanks to a consortium headed by the food company Royal Canin, a new survey was conducted in June 2016, and the results were not good: Cat owners were six times less likely to have taken their pets to the veterinarian this year as opposed to dog owners. (For more on the survey, turn to page 16 of this issue.)

This continues to happen despite advances in veterinary medicine, an increasing number of feline-only practices, house call services and a greater understanding of the nutritional and health needs of our cats.

Luckily, our cats are living longer, but still, most cat owners take their improved health for granted until there are signs of illness. By then, a trip to the veterinarian may not be so straightforward.

In this current issue, we discuss an interesting topic: ascites in cats. Essentially a sign (fluid in the abdomen) as opposed to a disease process in itself, by the time it is detected, the prognosis of the animal is guarded or even poor.

Perhaps regular bloodwork taken the year before would have picked up a few changes, and the treatment and outcome for the cat’s future would be different, more hopeful. Making time for regular veterinary exams throughout the life of your pet will give you the best chance of enjoying as much quality time together as possible.

In this issue, we also discuss the complex topic of domestic violence and its impact on people and also beloved pets. Victims may feel there is nowhere to turn, but luckily this is changing with increased awareness, resources and assistance for animals that may be caught in the crossfire. It’s an important topic that needs to be addressed, and I am glad that Catnip can be a forum to help educate readers.

Elizabeth Vecsi
Executive Editor

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